tryexceptpass

Could deep learning model a python to power your dockerized gaming AI while you cruise within the confines of subspace?

General Data Protection Regulation

Ying Li’s PyCon2018 keynote discussed the importance of writing secure software, and the responsibility that we, as developers, have in keeping users safe. While watching, it occurred to me that I haven’t written about the new European Union laws that stem from the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that goes into effect this month. I was involved in several conversations on this topic lately, so here’s some information on the rules, their implications and responses from businesses, and the reactions as the rest of the world tries to implement similar systems. Continue reading

Practicality Beats Purity - Microservices vs Monoliths

In recent years there’s a growing trend to move away from large all-in-one applications. These “monoliths”, developed with one codebase and delivered as one large system, are hard to maintain. In their place, the industry now favors splitting-off the component systems into individual services. As separate “microservices”, they perform the smallest functions possible grouped into logical units. They are independent deliverables, deployable, replaceable and upgradeable on their own.

Going further into the Practicality Beats Purity series, this article will cover the implications of transitioning to a microservices architecture.

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Practicality Beats Purity - Modularity

Continuing on the Practicality Beats Purity series, today we’re talking about modularity. While written with python in mind, the discussion here applies to any language that’s highly modular and with a large ecosystem.

As is touted frequently, python is quite famous for being a “batteries included” language with a vast ecosystem of modules and packages that provide almost every possible utility or function you’ll ever need. When building large applications, it’s a great idea to make use of this environment and not reinvent the wheel. This makes rapid development and prototyping real easy.

However, you must keep in mind that every new dependency added is one more variable that you have little to no control over. While you may not write the code yourself, there’s still cost incurred in keeping up with the most recent versions of your dependency and watching for security flaws and their respective fixes. It’s also important to pay attention to the size of the community around those dependencies, their interaction with other modules, responsiveness to reported bugs, and the size of supporting documentation both official (like read-the-docs) and unofficial (like stack overflow).

Following we discuss some of the costs.

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Practicality Beats Purity - Intro and Test Pass Rates Topic

A few hours later, I find myself sitting in the “comforts” of my cubicle. The discussion replaying over and over in my head: “An interface with this behavior will integrate with most common language libraries, with no special client code”, I said. The response was: “But then it’s not a design, and the company already decided that’s the route we’re taking.”

I’ve spent many years of my career involved in buzzword dogma discussions. It’s present at all levels of software development, from basic principles, to scheduling, to implementation, its interfaces, its tests, the execution, the infrastructure that runs it and its release mechanisms. Most of the time, people lose track of why or what they are building in favor of claiming they are using some common buzzword, regardless of the effects on architecture, ease of use, customer experience or maintenance costs. My experience shows they don’t even know why the buzzword technology does things a certain way or why it someone chose it in the first place. Factual or data-based counterargument results in an almost “religious” discussion and even shaming.

Given today’s ease of communication and the ability to share our experiences, it’s great that we try to educate other folks on the problems we typically face throughout our lives and careers. Especially the specific principles used in managing their solutions.

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Engineering the Tests that Matter

Going beyond the checkbox

As I sit in my standard issued cubicle, going through a typical test results report from the typical external test shop, I begin to shake my head in disgust.

I’m looking at a spreadsheet with endless rows and columns that associate a thumbs up / thumbs down with each one-liner that’s supposed to describe the test that executed.

What does all of this mean? Does that mean the test completed? Aborted? What does a thumbs up mean if a high priority issue was logged against it? Wait! If I read through this issue, the comments trail indicates that the test itself — not the item being tested — was modified to get a passing result! What is all this? Does any of it actually imply any type of quality level in the product that I’m testing?

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