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Could deep learning model a python to power your dockerized gaming AI while you cruise within the confines of subspace?

Making 3D Interfaces for Python with Unity3D

Using Sofi and WebSockets to command game engines

A while back I wrote a post on using with game engines as frontend interfaces. I want to enable rich interfaces in the Python ecosystem that are usable in virtual and augmented reality. Since then, I was able to build some basic concepts on top of Sofi and I’m here to share them.

The backend

Sofi works as a WebSocket server that can issue commands and handle events from a client. It’s written to simplify the use of frontend web technologies as interfaces to a Python backend. You can even package it as a desktop app with a desktop look and feel.

It functions by sending the user to a webpage with the basics needed to open a WebSocket client. This client then registers handlers that process server commands telling it how to alter the DOM or respond to events. All the logic resides with Python, the webpage is the user interface.

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How to Turn a Web App Into a Desktop App, Using Chromium and PyInstaller

Packaging and distributing your app sounds simple in principle. It’s just software. But in practice, it’s quite challenging.

I’ve been working on a Python module called Sofi that generates user interfaces. It can deliver a desktop feel while using standard single-page web technologies. For flexibility, I designed it to work through two methods of distribution: in-browser and executable.

Running in the browser, it functions much like a normal webpage. You can load it by opening a file, or launch it from your shell. I also built an executable that runs as a packaged app, independent and without external requirements.

Over time, as I hacked at code in Atom — my editor of choice these days — I remembered that Atom is actually a browser. It uses Node.js as a back end, and the Electron framework for its user interface.This inspired me to start poking at Electron’s internals, hoping to find examples and best practices on how they solved desktop packaging.

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The Trusted Packaging Index

A proposal for funding PyPI infrastructure and development

A few days ago, I was listening to the latest episode of Talk Python To Me: Are we failing to fund Python’s core infrastructure?, which had a panel of guests from the Python Software Foundation, PyPI and Read The Docs. As someone that writes open source code, the topic of sustainability is always floating around in my mind. Being able to mostly work on the things that tickle my brain would definitely be awesome, but even if you had a fantastically successful project — which I don’t — it still is extraordinarily difficult to achieve.

I always wondered how organizations like the PSF made it all work, especially with infrastructure and systems that have the level of traffic we see in PyPI. The closest parallel I can draw is to research projects, where a considerable amount of time is dedicated towards finding the right kind of funding.

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