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Designing Continuous Build Systems: Handling Webhooks with Sanic

After covering how to design a build pipeline and define build directives in the continuous builds series, it’s time to look at handling events from a code repository.

As internet standards evolved over the years, the HTTP protocol has become more prevalent. It’s easier to route, simpler to implement and even more reliable. This ubiquity makes it easier for applications that traverse or live on the public internet to communicate with each other. As a result of this, the idea of webhooks came to be as an “event-over-http” mechanism.

With GitHub as the repository management platform, we have the advantage of using their webhook system to communicate user actions over the internet and into our build pipeline.

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Asyncio in Python 3.7

The release of Python 3.7 introduced a number of changes into the async world. There are a lot of quality-of-life improvements, some affect compatibility across versions and some are new features to help manage concurrency better. This article will go over the changes, their implications and the things you’ll want to watch out for if you’re a maintainer. Some may even affect you even if you don’t use asyncio.

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Controlling Python Async Creep

Python added formal asynchronicity in the base language a while ago. It’s fun to play with asyncio tasks and coroutines, the basic constructs that execute almost in parallel. But as you start to integrate more with a regular codebase, you may find that things can get tricky. Especially if you’re forced to interact with synchronous code.

The complication arises when invoking awaitable functions. Doing so requires an async defined code block or coroutine. A non-issue except that if your caller has to be async, then you can’t call it either unless its caller is async. Which then forces its caller into an async block as well, and so on. This is “async creep”.

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Making 3D Interfaces for Python with Unity3D

A while back I wrote a post on using with game engines as frontend interfaces. I want to enable rich interfaces in the Python ecosystem that are usable in virtual and augmented reality. Since then, I was able to build some basic concepts on top of Sofi and I’m here to share them.

Using Sofi and WebSockets to command game engines

Sofi works as a WebSocket server that can issue commands and handle events from a client. It’s written to simplify the use of frontend web technologies as interfaces to a Python backend. You can even package it as a desktop app with a desktop look and feel.

It functions by sending the user to a webpage with the basics needed to open a WebSocket client. This client then registers handlers that process server commands telling it how to alter the DOM or respond to events. All the logic resides with Python, the webpage is the user interface.

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Threaded Asynchronous Magic and How to Wield It

Ok let’s face it. Clock speeds no longer govern the pace at which computer processors improve. Instead we see increased transistor density and higher core counts. Translating to software terms, this means that code won’t run faster, but more of it can run in parallel.

Although making good use of our new-found silicon real estate requires improvements in software, a lot of programming languages have already started down this path by adding features that help with parallel execution. In fact, they’ve been there for years waiting for us to take advantage.

So why don’t we? A good engineer always has an ear to the ground, listening for the latest trends in his industry, so let’s take a look at what Python is building for us.

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A Python Ate My GUI - Part 3: Implementation

Time to Bootstrap your D3, pick up that Python and hop on the Autobahn

If you aren’t aware of my earlier posts, check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this series so that you get some context for this ongoing exercise.

Since I started thinking about and working on these posts, I’ve also been developing the ideas on GitHub as a side project I called sofi.

Sofi is a Python 3 package that serves as the starter implementation of the design discussed in Part 2: a system that will generate the necessary HTML and JavaScript code typically needed to produce a single-page application and serve it up through WebSockets (not an HTTP server).

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