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Practicality Beats Purity - Intro and Test Pass Rates Topic

A few hours later, I find myself sitting in the “comforts” of my cubicle. The discussion replaying over and over in my head: “An interface with this behavior will integrate with most common language libraries, with no special client code”, I said. The response was: “But then it’s not a design, and the company already decided that’s the route we’re taking.”

I’ve spent many years of my career involved in buzzword dogma discussions. It’s present at all levels of software development, from basic principles, to scheduling, to implementation, its interfaces, its tests, the execution, the infrastructure that runs it and its release mechanisms. Most of the time, people lose track of why or what they are building in favor of claiming they are using some common buzzword, regardless of the effects on architecture, ease of use, customer experience or maintenance costs. My experience shows they don’t even know why the buzzword technology does things a certain way or why someone chose it in the first place. Factual or data-based counterargument results in an almost “religious” discussion and even shaming.

Given today’s ease of communication and the ability to share our experiences, it’s great that we try to educate other folks on the problems we typically face throughout our lives and careers. Especially the principles used in managing their solutions.

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On Democratizing the Next Generation of User Interfaces

Musings of a dev trying to plan for the future

I remember making a program come alive back in the days of the IBM System 23. It was my first endeavor into programming. I must have been 7 years old and already using terminals for data entry to help my dad out in his business. I wrote code that highlighted items on the screen in different shades. For the younger me, it was an achievement to be proud of, even though color was not yet available in these monitors.

Fast forward a few decades — yes, only a few — and we’re in a completely different universe. One where 3D gaming with thousands of people at the same time is possible. A space that collides with realistic physics, represented by lifelike graphics and beautiful scenery.

While a gigantic leap from the olden days of monochrome monitors and ASCII graphics. From a human’s perspective, there’s still a layer of separation between reality and the digital world. But we’re about ready to break through that barrier.

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Engineering the Tests that Matter

As I sit in my standard issued cubicle, going through a typical test results report from the typical external test shop, I begin to shake my head in disgust.

I’m looking at a spreadsheet with endless rows and columns that associate a thumbs up / thumbs down with each one-liner that’s supposed to describe the test that executed.

What does all of this mean? Does that mean the test completed? Aborted? What does a thumbs up mean if a high priority issue was logged against it? Wait! If I read through this issue, the comments trail indicates that the test itself — not the item being tested — was modified to get a passing result! What is all this? Does any of it actually imply any type of quality level in the product that I’m testing?

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Open Source Contributions Are Part of My Professional Development

“Boy did I spend a bunch of time organizing all my issues today” — he said while trying not to sound like a whiner — “You know… I found this neat tool yesterday that easily integrates with our repository management software. It adds project management capabilities that would save us time. Might be interesting to take a look?” — He ended his sentence with a question, something that he absolutely hates doing, a sticking point he’s had since spending a lot of time with a coworker that incessantly did that. He definitely did not want to sound insecure while talking to his manager.

The manager looks up, away from the computer screen in which he was diligently reassigning issues to their newly requested releases, and instead answers with the dreaded: “Is that tool freeware? Did you download it?”. The programmer, a lonely, isolated peon that was simply trying to make his own life easier, was definitely not expecting that response, and so he answered with the unfiltered truth (those of you that often communicate with management know what I’m talking about).

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